Agnis Warner

b. 24 February 1747, d. 18 January 1759
Charts
John Warner
     Agnis Warner was born on 24 February 1747 in Waterbury, New Haven, Connecticut, America.1 She was the daughter of Obediah Warner and Sarah Lewis. Agnis Warner died on 18 January 1759 in Waterbury, Connecticut, America at age 11.1

Citations

  1. [S225] Lucius A. and Lucius B. Barbour, Barbour: Connecticut vital records prior to 1850.

Huldah Nichols

b. 8 March 1747, d. 1821
Charts
John Warner
     Huldah Nichols was born on 8 March 1747 in Waterbury, New Haven, Connecticut, America.1 She was the daughter of Richard Nichols and Elizabeth Hickocks. Circa 1768 in Waterbury, in New Haven, Connecticut, America, Huldah Nichols married Joseph Warner, son of Obediah Warner and Sarah Lewis. Her married name was Huldah Warner (Nichols). Huldah Nichols died in 1821 in Waterbury, Connecticut, USA.

Children of Huldah Nichols and Joseph Warner

Citations

  1. [S225] Lucius A. and Lucius B. Barbour, Barbour: Connecticut vital records prior to 1850.

Ann Wren

b. circa 1748
     Ann Wren was born circa 1748 in King George, Virginia, America. She was the daughter of John Wren and Anne Lloyd.

Nicolas Kayser

b. circa 1748, d. 11 April 1818
     Nicolas Kayser was born circa 1748 in Grevels, Redange, Diekirch, Luxemburg.1 Circa 1772 Luxemburg, Nicolas Kayser married Anne Greten, daughter of Michael Greten and Maria Wagener.1 Nicolas Kayser died on 11 April 1818 in Rammeldange, Luxembourg-Campagne, Luxemburg.1

Child of Nicolas Kayser and Anne Greten

Citations

  1. [S249] Lentz Ernsdorff, Family History.

Henry Childers

b. circa 1748
     Henry Childers was born circa 1748 in Henrico, Virginia, America. He was the son of Henry Childers and Mary Farmer.

Catherine Keyser

b. circa 1748, d. 21 February 1817
     Catherine Keyser was born circa 1748 in Schrondweiler, Nommern, Mersch, Luxemburg. She was the daughter of Pierre Keyser and Elizabeth Kirsch. On Saturday, 10 December 1763 Luxemburg, Catherine Keyser married Jean Pierre Lentz, age 35, son of Nicolas Lentz and Anne Fohlen. John's step-father, Michael Lentz, was his witness.1 Her married name was Catherine Lentz (Keyser). Catherine Keyser died on 21 February 1817 in Schrondweiler, Mersch, Luxemburg.

Children of Catherine Keyser and Jean Pierre Lentz

Citations

  1. [S250] 1962 Filmé par la Genealogical Society of Utah, Nommern, Luxembourg; Registres paroissiaux, 1637 - 1797.

Joseph Kellogg

b. 5 October 1748
     Joseph Kellogg was born on 5 October 1748 in Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, America. On Thursday, 28 November 1782 in Springfield, in Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA, Joseph Kellogg married Elioner Stephenson, age 30, daughter of Benajah Stephenson and Almy Long. In 1790 the Census listed Joseph Kellogg as the head of a family in Springfield in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. Benajah and Joseph Kellogg are sharing one house.1 In 1800 the Census listed Joseph Kellogg as the head of a family in Springfield in Hampshire County, Massachusetts.2

Children of Joseph Kellogg and Elioner Stephenson

Citations

  1. [S320] 1790 US Federal Census Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts.
  2. [S172] 1800 US Federal Census Springfield Hampshire MA.

Marie Noel

b. 8 October 1748, d. 12 February 1821
     Marie Noel was born on 8 October 1748 in Ay-sur-Moselle, Mozelle, France. On Tuesday, 19 July 1785 in Metz, Mozelle, France, Marie Noel married Francois Senners.1 Her married name was Marie Senners (Noel). Marie Noel died on 12 February 1821 in Ay-sur-Moselle, Mozelle, France at age 72.1

Child of Marie Noel and Francois Senners

Citations

  1. [S249] Lentz Ernsdorff, Family History.

Nicolas Ernsdorff

b. 28 May 1749, d. 8 March 1828
     Nicolas Ernsdorff was employed as a tailor.1 He was baptized on 28 May 1749 in Clausen, in Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, Luxemburg.1 He was the son of Lewis Ernsdorff and Catherine Falehez. Circa 1772 in Rammeldange, in Hostert, Luxembourg-Campagne, Luxemburg, Nicolas Ernsdorff married Anne Marie Hilger.1 Nicolas Ernsdorff died on 8 March 1828 in Rammeldange, Luxembourg-Campagne, Luxemburg at age 78.1

Child of Nicolas Ernsdorff and Anne Marie Hilger

Citations

  1. [S249] Lentz Ernsdorff, Family History.

Sarah Beebe

b. 25 July 1749, d. 22 January 1809
     Sarah Beebe was born on 25 July 1749 in New London, New London, Connecticut, America.1 She was the daughter of Ezekiel Beebe and Hannah Rogers. Sarah Beebe died on 22 January 1809 in Wilbraham, Massachusetts, USA at age 59.

Citations

  1. [S225] Lucius A. and Lucius B. Barbour, Barbour: Connecticut vital records prior to 1850.

Irena Warner

b. 17 September 1749
Charts
John Warner
     Irena Warner was baptized on 17 September 1749 in Waterbury, Connecticut, America by R. Mansfield.1,2 She was the daughter of Obediah Warner and Sarah Lewis. Circa 1769 in Waterbury, in New Haven, Connecticut, America, Irena Warner married Abijah Warner.

Citations

  1. [S225] Lucius A. and Lucius B. Barbour, Barbour: Connecticut vital records prior to 1850.
  2. [S239] Rhena Warner, Baptisms by R. Mansfield, Missionary.

James Stephenson

b. circa 1750
     James Stephenson was born circa 1750 in Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, America. He was the son of John Stephenson. James Stephenson and John Stephenson appear on the census of 1790 in Plattsburgh in Clinton County, New York.

(?) Loomis

b. circa 1750
     (?) Loomis was born circa 1750. Circa 1780 in Rutland, in Rutland, Vermont, USA, (?) Loomis married Agnes Gardner.

Alexander McClain

b. circa 1750
     Alexander McClain was born circa 1750 in Virginia, America. He was the son of William McClain. Circa 1770 in Pendleton, Kentucky, USA, Alexander McClain married Mary (?). Alexander McClain's wife Mary is mentioned in a deed transaction in 1799. In 1794 Alexander McClain lived; became part of Campbell County in 1794. He was mentioned in a lawsuit or legal action on 7 September 1795 in Newport, Campbell, Kentucky, USA. Alex. McClain gave his assent to the building of a mill by Jacob Groshongs.1 He was mentioned in a lawsuit or legal action on 2 November 1795 in Newport, Campbell, Kentucky, USA. Ordered that John Ewing, Mathew Glaves, Alexr. McClain and Samuel Cook or any three of them being first Sworn do view & mark out the nearest and best way from the ford on Crooked Creek to where it will strik(e) the first waters of Grassy Creek on a Direction to the ford on Raven (?) Creek and Make report to Court of the Convenience & inconvenience of said road.
Dec 7, 1795 The Persons appointed to lay off the Road from the Fork on crooked Creek to Grassy Creek made their Report in these words "In submission to the Court of Campbell County according to the order we have reviewed the Road from Crooked Creek to Grassy Creek & we find that there can be a sufficient Wagon Road without much difficulty".
Signed John Ewing, Alexander McClean, Matthew Glaves.1 He is found on the Tax List of in 1796 at in Campbell, Kentucky, USA. 500 acres of south fork of the Licking (there is also a William McClain but his acreage is not listed.)2 He was mentioned in a lawsuit or legal action on 2 May 1796 in Newport, Campbell, Kentucky, USA. Ordered to evaluate the estate of Joel Hume.1 He and William McClain are is found on the Tax List of in 1797 at in Campbell, Kentucky, USA. 500 acres of south fork of the Licking (there is also a William McClain who has 150 acres at Bank Lick.)3 Alexander McClain sold land on 1 October 1799 in Pendleton County Kentucky to Labon Shipp.

Children of Alexander McClain and Mary (?)

Citations

  1. [S348] Campbell County Kentucky Court Proceedings.
  2. [S349] Campbell County Kentucky Tax List 1796,.
  3. [S347] Campbell County Kentucky Tax List 1797,.

Daniel Richardson

b. circa 1750
     Daniel Richardson was born circa 1750 in Maryland, America. Circa 1780, Daniel Richardson married Nancy (?).

Child of Daniel Richardson and Nancy (?)

Thomas Childers

b. circa 1750
     Thomas Childers was born circa 1750 in Henrico, Virginia, America. He was the son of Henry Childers and Mary Farmer.

Nicholas Pryor Jr

b. 1750
     Nicholas Pryor Jr was born in 1750 in Albemarle, Virginia, America. Per AGBI. He was the son of F. Nicholas Pryor and Mary (?) Nicholas Pryor Jr and William Pryor was in military service during the Revolutionary War ; William Pryor was born in Albemarle (now Amberst), about 1752. Moved to the Great Kanawha in fall of 1773, and planted corn next spring, but was driven back to Amherst by Indians. Was at Point Pleasant, spring of 1775, and there saw Capt. Isaac Shelby, who had been left with the wounded after the battle the preceding October. Early in 1776 the Indians were so troublesome that he, with many others had to take shelter in the fort at Point Pleasant, and here substituted for James Frazer, in the command of Capt. Matthew Arbuckle, who was in charge of the fort. The subalterns were Lieutenants Andrew Wallace, James Thompson and Ensigns Samuel Wood and James McNutt. After serving out eight months for Frazer in the fall he enlisted under Arbuckle for two years. About this time Capt. William McKee, Lt. James Gilmer, and many privates came to Point Pleasant and were stationed under Arbuckle. Was often sent on detail with others up the Kanawha to a plantation to get corn, and was often a spy or on guard on the Ohio above the fort. In the fall of 1777, Colonels Skillern and Dickinson came on an expedition against the Shawnee towns. He met this force at the mouth of Elk. Among others of them were James Harrison and Micajah Goodwin. When they reached the fort, Lt. Gilmer went over the Kanawha to shoot turkeys and was there killed by unknown Indians. As soon as Gilmer's body was brought to the fort his men murdered Cornstalk, his son Ellinipsico, and another Indian, these Indians being held as hostages for the safety of the garrison and the settlers. While Skillern and Dickenson were at Point Pleasant, Gen. Hand, of the Continental army, came from Pittsburg and ordered a return, saying it was too late in the season to attack Chillicothe and other Indian towns. Hand ordered Arbuckle and McKee to shorten the pay and daily allowance of their men, saying they feasted too high. When this order was put into execution almost every man in the fort shouldered his gun and put on his knapsack, resolving to go home. But Col. McDowell told Hand of the impolicy of such measure and obtained permission to address the men, who on being promised their former pay and allowance, returned to duty. He himself took no part in the mutiny. Because of the murder of Cornstalk, the Shawnees, in the spring of 1778, [p.85] mustered all their strength and besieged Point Pleasant several days. They killed Paddy Sherman and wounded Lt. Gilmer. Finding they could not take the fort they killed all the stock of the garrison and then started for the Greenbrier settlements. We knew of this from the Grenadier Squaw, said to be a sister of Cornstalk. She had taken shelter in the fort soon after its erection, and continued with us. When her own stock was killed she went out with spirits and became intoxicated, but overheard the Indians and told the officers of their plans. Capt. McKee then proposed that if any two men would go out and warn the Greenbrier people, he would so extend their furloughs as to be equivalent to a discharge, which itself he could not grant. John Inchminger and John Logan accepted and started, but returned the same evening. Philip Hammond and myself then agreed to go, but I gave way to my older brother, John, whom Hammond preferred and who was more experienced in Indian warfare. They were dressed in Indian style by the Granadier Squaw, and passed the Indians at some meadow about 12 miles from Donally's fort. They gave information and the settlers had been in the fort but a little while when the Indians attacked and a dreadful conflict ensued. Capt. Arbuckle was then in Greenbrier visiting his family. He and Capt. Lewis raised a company and forced their way into the fort. The Indians were driven off with much loss and Greenbrier was thus saved. During this expedition of the Indians, Gen. Clark stopped at Point Pleasant on his way to take Vincennes. In the autumn of 1778, there was a man in the fort named Morgan who had been a prisoner among the Indians many years. A squaw with him was said to be his wife. Morgan was in custody and ironed, and was to be taken to his father who had offered a large reward for his return. But finding himself lightly guarded, he and the squaw ran off and were never again heard of. Suspecting he would reach the Indian towns and tell that our time was nearly out, and that many of us would soon leave, the officers discharged many, including myself. In 1779 was drafted from Amherst for a three months' tour a little below Richmond. He served under Capt. Samuel Higgenbotham, of Col. Christian's regiment, and among his comrades were Zedekiah Shumaker, William Brown, and Samuel Allen. In 1780, he was out three months under Capt. Richard Ballinger, serving at Fort Powhatan, below Richmond, now (1832), Fort Jefferson. Among his comrades this tour were an elder brother, Nicholas Pryor, and Richard Tankersly. [p.86]1 On 20 May 1777 Receipt to Thomas Madison for his pay in "Lieut Evan Shelbys pay roll Canoe Men" Witnessed by R Thomas.2 The 1800 Tax List listed Nicholas Pryor Jr as the head of a family in Amherst, Virginia, USA.

Citations

  1. [S701] J T McAllister, Virginia Militia in the Revolutionary War.
  2. [S702] Mabel Clare Weaks Lyman Copeland Draper, The Preston and Virginia papers of the Draper collection of Manuscripts.

Mary Warner

b. 6 August 1751
Charts
John Warner
     Mary Warner was born on 6 August 1751 in Waterbury, New Haven, Connecticut, America.1 She was the daughter of Obediah Warner and Sarah Lewis.

Citations

  1. [S225] Lucius A. and Lucius B. Barbour, Barbour: Connecticut vital records prior to 1850.

Abel Hancock Jr

b. 11 September 1751, d. before 1782
     Abel Hancock Jr was born on 11 September 1751 in Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, America. On Thursday, 15 July 1773 in Springfield, in Hampshire, Massachusetts, America, Abel Hancock Jr married Elioner Stephenson, age 20, daughter of Benajah Stephenson and Almy Long. Abel Hancock Jr died before 1782 in Springfield, Massachusetts, America.

Child of Abel Hancock Jr and Elioner Stephenson

Obed Lombard

b. 14 November 1751
     Obed Lombard was born on 14 November 1751 in Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, America. He was the son of Joseph Lombard and Hannah Dorchester. Obed Lombard appears on the census of 1800 in Springfield in Hampshire County, Massachusetts.1

Citations

  1. [S172] 1800 US Federal Census Springfield Hampshire MA.

William Wren

b. circa 1752
     William Wren was born circa 1752 in King George, Virginia, America. He was the son of John Wren and Anne Lloyd.

Millicent Childers

b. circa 1752
     Millicent Childers was born circa 1752 in Henrico, Virginia, America. She was the daughter of Henry Childers and Mary Farmer.

William Pryor

b. 1752
     William Pryor was born in 1752 in Albemarle, Virginia, America. He was the son of F. Nicholas Pryor and Mary (?) William Pryor and Nicholas Pryor Jr was in military service during the Revolutionary War ; William Pryor was born in Albemarle (now Amberst), about 1752. Moved to the Great Kanawha in fall of 1773, and planted corn next spring, but was driven back to Amherst by Indians. Was at Point Pleasant, spring of 1775, and there saw Capt. Isaac Shelby, who had been left with the wounded after the battle the preceding October. Early in 1776 the Indians were so troublesome that he, with many others had to take shelter in the fort at Point Pleasant, and here substituted for James Frazer, in the command of Capt. Matthew Arbuckle, who was in charge of the fort. The subalterns were Lieutenants Andrew Wallace, James Thompson and Ensigns Samuel Wood and James McNutt. After serving out eight months for Frazer in the fall he enlisted under Arbuckle for two years. About this time Capt. William McKee, Lt. James Gilmer, and many privates came to Point Pleasant and were stationed under Arbuckle. Was often sent on detail with others up the Kanawha to a plantation to get corn, and was often a spy or on guard on the Ohio above the fort. In the fall of 1777, Colonels Skillern and Dickinson came on an expedition against the Shawnee towns. He met this force at the mouth of Elk. Among others of them were James Harrison and Micajah Goodwin. When they reached the fort, Lt. Gilmer went over the Kanawha to shoot turkeys and was there killed by unknown Indians. As soon as Gilmer's body was brought to the fort his men murdered Cornstalk, his son Ellinipsico, and another Indian, these Indians being held as hostages for the safety of the garrison and the settlers. While Skillern and Dickenson were at Point Pleasant, Gen. Hand, of the Continental army, came from Pittsburg and ordered a return, saying it was too late in the season to attack Chillicothe and other Indian towns. Hand ordered Arbuckle and McKee to shorten the pay and daily allowance of their men, saying they feasted too high. When this order was put into execution almost every man in the fort shouldered his gun and put on his knapsack, resolving to go home. But Col. McDowell told Hand of the impolicy of such measure and obtained permission to address the men, who on being promised their former pay and allowance, returned to duty. He himself took no part in the mutiny. Because of the murder of Cornstalk, the Shawnees, in the spring of 1778, [p.85] mustered all their strength and besieged Point Pleasant several days. They killed Paddy Sherman and wounded Lt. Gilmer. Finding they could not take the fort they killed all the stock of the garrison and then started for the Greenbrier settlements. We knew of this from the Grenadier Squaw, said to be a sister of Cornstalk. She had taken shelter in the fort soon after its erection, and continued with us. When her own stock was killed she went out with spirits and became intoxicated, but overheard the Indians and told the officers of their plans. Capt. McKee then proposed that if any two men would go out and warn the Greenbrier people, he would so extend their furloughs as to be equivalent to a discharge, which itself he could not grant. John Inchminger and John Logan accepted and started, but returned the same evening. Philip Hammond and myself then agreed to go, but I gave way to my older brother, John, whom Hammond preferred and who was more experienced in Indian warfare. They were dressed in Indian style by the Granadier Squaw, and passed the Indians at some meadow about 12 miles from Donally's fort. They gave information and the settlers had been in the fort but a little while when the Indians attacked and a dreadful conflict ensued. Capt. Arbuckle was then in Greenbrier visiting his family. He and Capt. Lewis raised a company and forced their way into the fort. The Indians were driven off with much loss and Greenbrier was thus saved. During this expedition of the Indians, Gen. Clark stopped at Point Pleasant on his way to take Vincennes. In the autumn of 1778, there was a man in the fort named Morgan who had been a prisoner among the Indians many years. A squaw with him was said to be his wife. Morgan was in custody and ironed, and was to be taken to his father who had offered a large reward for his return. But finding himself lightly guarded, he and the squaw ran off and were never again heard of. Suspecting he would reach the Indian towns and tell that our time was nearly out, and that many of us would soon leave, the officers discharged many, including myself. In 1779 was drafted from Amherst for a three months' tour a little below Richmond. He served under Capt. Samuel Higgenbotham, of Col. Christian's regiment, and among his comrades were Zedekiah Shumaker, William Brown, and Samuel Allen. In 1780, he was out three months under Capt. Richard Ballinger, serving at Fort Powhatan, below Richmond, now (1832), Fort Jefferson. Among his comrades this tour were an elder brother, Nicholas Pryor, and Richard Tankersly. [p.86]1

Citations

  1. [S701] J T McAllister, Virginia Militia in the Revolutionary War.

Anne Greten

b. March 1752, d. 27 May 1793
     Anne Greten was born in March 1752 in Rammeldange, Hostert, Luxembourg-Campagne, Luxemburg.1 She was the daughter of Michael Greten and Maria Wagener. Circa 1772 Luxemburg, Anne Greten married Nicolas Kayser.1 Her married name was Anne Kayser (Greten). Anne Greten died on 27 May 1793 in Rammeldange, Luxembourg-Campagne, Luxemburg at age 41.1

Child of Anne Greten and Nicolas Kayser

Citations

  1. [S249] Lentz Ernsdorff, Family History.

Elioner Stephenson

b. 24 July 1752, d. 30 April 1808
     Elioner Stephenson was born on 24 July 1752 in Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, America.1 She was the daughter of Benajah Stephenson and Almy Long. Elioner Stephenson was baptized on 2 August 1752 in West Springfield, Massachusetts, America.2 On Thursday, 15 July 1773 in Springfield, in Hampshire, Massachusetts, America, Elioner Stephenson married Abel Hancock Jr, age 21. Her married name was Elioner Hancock (Stephenson). On Thursday, 28 November 1782 in Springfield, in Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA, Elioner Stephenson married Joseph Kellogg, age 34. Her married name was Elioner Kellogg (Stephenson). Elioner was listed as a household member living in Joseph Kellogg's family on the Census of 1800 in Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, America.3 Elioner Stephenson died on 30 April 1808 in Springfield, Massachusetts, America at age 55.

Child of Elioner Stephenson and Abel Hancock Jr

Children of Elioner Stephenson and Joseph Kellogg

Citations

  1. [S168] Springfield (Massachusetts). City Clerk (Main Author), Vital records of Springfield, Massachusetts, 1638-1887, Record of Births, Marriages, and Deaths; Vol. 2, 1728-1772. (FHL 185414) page 107.
  2. [S167] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Vital records of West Springfield, Massachusetts, to the year 1850.
  3. [S172] 1800 US Federal Census Springfield Hampshire MA.

Solomon Cooley

b. 24 January 1753
     Solomon Cooley was born on 24 January 1753 in Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, America. On Sunday, 11 October 1778 in West Springfield, in Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA, Solomon Cooley married Lucy Stephenson, age 17, daughter of John Stephenson and Margaret Webb.1

Citations

  1. [S318] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Marriages in West Springfield, Massachusetts 1774 - 1796.

Olive Lombard

b. 18 February 1753, d. after 1820
     Olive Lombard was born on 18 February 1753 in Springfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, America.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Lombard and Hannah Dorchester. On Thursday, 23 April 1772 in West Springfield, in Hampshire, Massachusetts, America, Olive Lombard married Abiather Stephenson, age 18, son of Benajah Stephenson and Almy Long.2,1 Her married name was Olive Stephenson (Lombard). Olive Lombard was listed as Abiather Stephenson's wife on the Census of 1800 in Springfield in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. One male and one female over 45 years of age. One male under 10, one female under 10, one female between 10 and 15 and one female 16 through 25.3
Olive Lombard was listed as Caleb Stephenson's mother on the Census of 1810 in Junius, Seneca, New York.4 Olive Lombard was listed as Abiather Stephenson's wife on the Census of 1820 in Bloomfield in Ontario County, New York. One male and one female over 45 years of age. She was age 67 at that time.5
Olive Lombard died after 1820 in Bloomfield, New York, USA.

Children of Olive Lombard and Abiather Stephenson

Citations

  1. [S170] Copied by Ella May Lewis, Baptisms, Marriages and Deaths, 1736-1809, First Church, Springfield, Massa.
  2. [S167] New England Historic Genealogical Society, Vital records of West Springfield, Massachusetts, to the year 1850.
  3. [S172] 1800 US Federal Census Springfield Hampshire MA.
  4. [S234] 1810 US Federal Census Seneca Co. New York.
  5. [S174] 1820 US Federal Census Ontario Co. New York.

Mathias Lentz

b. 14 August 1753, d. 6 May 1760
     Mathias Lentz was born on 14 August 1753 in Schrondweiler, Nommern, Mersch, Luxemburg. He was the son of Michael Lentz and Marie Keyser. Mathias Lentz died on 6 May 1760 in Schrondweiler, Mersch, Luxemburg at age 6.

Ezekiel Beebe

b. 20 December 1753, d. 21 July 1844
     Ezekiel Beebe was born on 20 December 1753 in New London, New London, Connecticut, America. He was the son of Ezekiel Beebe and Mary MacMullen. Ezekiel Beebe was in military service during the Revolutionary War between 1775 and 1779 ; Beebe, Ezekiel, Ludlow. Private, Capt. Paul Langdon's co., which marched April 20, 1775, in response to the alarm of April 19, 1775, from Wilbraham; service, 9 days; reported enlisted into the army April 29, 1775; also, Capt. Langdon's co., Col. Timothy Danielson's regt; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 29, 1775; service, 3 mos. 10 days; also, company return dated Oct. 6, 1775; also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent in money, dated Jan. 1, 1776; also, return of men enlisted into Continental Army from Capt. Joseph Miller's co., Hampshire Co. regt., dated Feb. 16, 1779; residence, Ludlow; enlisted for town of Ludlow; joined Capt. Oliver's co., Col. Greaton's regt; enlistment, 3 years; also, Capt. Oliver's co., Col. John Greaton's regt; Continental Army pay accounts for service from May 12, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; reported as serving 4 mos. as Drummer, 27 mos. 19 days as Private; also, Capt. Edward Cumston's co., Col. Greaton's regt; return of men in service on or before Aug. 15, 1777.1 On Friday, 25 April 1783 in Rutland, in Rutland, Vermont, USA, Ezekiel Beebe married Agnes Gardner.2 In 1800 the Census listed Ezekiel Beebe as the head of a family in Rutland in Rutland County, Vermont. One man and one woman 26 - 44, two boys and three girls 10 - 15, and one girl 16 - 25.3 In 1830 the Census listed Ezekiel Beebe as the head of a family in Rutland in Rutland County, Vermont. He died on 21 July 1844 in Waterloo, New York, USA at age 90.2 He was buried on 22 July 1844 in Seneca Falls, New York, USA.2

Citations

  1. [S171] Secretary of the Commonwealth. Massachusetts Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution.
  2. [S308] Adah Beebe Seger, Beebe, Beebee, Beeby.
  3. [S304] 1800 US Federal Census Rutland, Vermont.

Mary Childers

b. circa 1754
     Mary Childers was born circa 1754 in Henrico, Virginia, America. She was the daughter of Henry Childers and Mary Farmer.